Nice to See CDS Quotes (Credit Default Swaps) On Bloomberg.com

Source: Wikimedia Commons
Humankind might have a decent chance of survival now. I found credit default swap quotes on Bloomberg.com, but they are still unsearchable on their site. I found sovereign CDS quotes and a few corporates via Google. Most are labeled as the symbol itself so it's hard to find them by name. Quotes are the 5-year credit default swap priced in spread (premium payment/year) which protect against a bond default, ranging from corporate bonds, state debt, Treasuries and foreign Government debt. I could not find CDS indices (NAIG/investment grade corporate bond CDS, NAHY/high yield CDS, ABX/asset backed securities CDS, CMBX/commercial mortgage backed securities CDS, MCDX/muni bond CDS and more). *For those indexes, Markit actually has quotes and charts available on their website. Basically you're watching credit quality trade on a daily basis (real-time credit ratings).

Any piece of debt with a pulse can be insured with a credit default swap. The contracts are originated and traded by banks (Goldman Sachs et al.), insurance companies (AIG) and hedge funds. It's actually a great way to hedge debt and capitalize on credit volatility, until the insurer can't pay up on the claim (AIG haha). With the sovereign debt crisis upon us, you can find most government bonds and CDS on Bloomberg.com. Most have historical charts going back 5-years.

Corporate Credit Default Swaps (CDS) [some outside US, need to find more]
GENERAL ELECTRIC CAPITAL CDS USD 5Y (GECC)
MORGAN STANLEY CDS USD 5Y
GOLDMAN SACHS CDS USD 5Y
JP MORGAN CDS USD 5Y
BANK OF AMERICA CDS USD 5Y
WELLS FARGO CDS USD 5Y
CITIGROUP CDS USD 5Y (CGI)
MERRILL LYNCH CDS USD 5Y
U.S. BANK CDS AVERAGE*
CDS BID-ASK SPREAD*
AIG GROUP CDS USD 5Y
US STEEL CDS USD 5Y (X)
BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY CDS USD 5Y
ALCOA CDS USD 5Y
FAIRFAX FINANCIAL HOLDINGS CDS USD 5Y
TATA MOTORS CDS USD 5Y
CEMEX CDS USD 5Y
WOODSIDE PETROLEUM CDS USD 5Y
BOEING CDS USD 5Y (BA)
AT&T CDS USD 5Y (ATT)
ALLSTATE CDS USD 5Y (ALL)
IBM CDS USD 5Y
PFIZER CDS USD 5Y (PFE)
MCDONALDS CDS USD 5Y (MCD)
TARGET CDS USD 5Y (TGT)
ALLY BANK CDS USD 5Y (Formerly GMAC Bank)
FORD CDS USD 5Y (FCO, CFM1U5)
CATERPILLAR CDS USD 5Y (CAT)
WALMART CDS USD 5Y (WMT)
JC PENNEY 5Y CDS (JCP)
DOW CHEMICAL CDS USD 5Y (DOW)
HEWLETT-PACKARD CDS USD 5Y (CHWP1U5)
DELL 5Y CDS
GENERAL ELECTRIC CORP CDS USD 5Y (CGEIUM:IND)
HARTFORD CDS USD 5Y
PETROLEOS DE VENEZUELA CDS USD 5Y (PDVSA)
NORINCHUKIN BANK CDS USD 5Y
UST LLC 5Y CDS
SANPAOLO IMI SPA 5Y CDS
ROYAL BANK OF SCOTLAND 5Y CDS (EUR)
LLOYDS TSB BANK PLC 5Y CDS
BNP PARIBAS SA 5Y CDS
UNICREDIT SpA 5Y CDS
SOCIETE GENERALE SA 5Y CDS
BANCO SANTANDER SA 5Y CDS
CREDIT AGRICOLE 5Y CDS
ING GROEP NV 5Y CDS
BANCO POPOLARE SC 5Y CDS
COMMERZBANK AG 5Y CDS
BANK OF IRELAND 5Y CDS
DEUTSCHE BANK 5Y CDS
BARCLAYS BANK PLC 5Y CDS
HSBC Holdings PLC 5Y CDS

Update 8/26/2011: Anyone know where quotes/charts are of European Bank CDS? (Royal Bank of Scotland, Barclays, Lloyds, BNP Paribas, Unicredito, Credit Agricole, Banco Santander, Societe Generale etc). Their CDS spreads are wider than they were in 2008. Somewhat important, no? *Found them (courtesy of Marco's comment below), I added them above.

Sovereign (Government) Credit Default Swaps (CDS)
JAPAN CDS USD 5Y (here are 3m-30y JGB yields)
JAPAN CDS USD 10Y
US TREASURY CDS EUR5Y (<- in Euros, anyone find 10Y?)
STATE OF CALIFORNIA CDS USD 5Y
UNITED KINGDOM CDS USD 5Y
UNITED KINGDOM CDS USD 10Y
NETHERLANDS 5Y CDS
TURKEY CDS USD 5Y
HUNGARY CDS USD 5Y
AUSTRIA CDS USD 5Y
SWEDEN CDS USD 5Y
BULGARIA CDS USD 5Y
LATVIA CDS EUR 5Y
KAZAKHSTAN CDS 5Y
IRELAND CDS USD 5Y
SOUTH AFRICA CDS USD 5Y
SPAIN CDS USD 5Y (works)
PORTUGAL CDS USD 5Y
GREECE CDS USD 5Y check update
ITALY CDS USD 5Y (works)
RUSSIA CDS USD 5Y
ICELAND CDS
ARGENTINA CDS USD 5Y
VENEZUELA CDS USD 5Y
CHINA GOV CDS USD 5Y
CHILE CDS USD 5Y
GERMAN CDS USD 5Y
REPUBLIC OF KOREA CDS USD 5Y
BRAZIL CDS USD 5Y
FRANCE CDS USD 5Y
UKRAINE CDS USD 5Y
POLAND CDS USD 5Y
ISRAEL 5Y CDS
PIIGS CDS (Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Greece and Spain Average)
G6 CDS*

This is just a few; please let me know if you find anymore or a quote is not working. *A commenter posted more links to CDS quotes.

A little after the fact, but it's good to see CDS data available with a chart (albeit a few) to prepare yourself, retirement account or job for the next Fortune 500 massacre, whenever it may be. The mentality that only large financial institutions should care about credit default swaps, LIBOR (inter-bank lending rate) etc, in my opinion, misleads small investors and retirement accounts involved in the publicly traded markets. Also, did any business school teach about the risks involved with OTC derivatives, leverage and counterparties? What ever happened with that. Why did we have to rely on congressional hearings to educate the public on what went down "over-the-counter" between banks, insurers and hedge funds. I'm sure people with passively managed accounts could still care less about CDS, even if they lose money for 15 years straight, but it doesn't hurt to watch credit quality trade. Happy July 4th by the way.

See quotes of other useful financial indicators including government Bond Yields, municipal bond yields, corporate bond yields, credit spreads and volatility Indexes and check out this list of quotes at Market Ticker and Trader Crucible.

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Update 11/7/2011: I was noted that these quotes are back up on Bloomberg.com. I'm not going to retract my opinions here though, just in case they vanish again.

Update 10/29/2011: Unfortunately, single-name CDS (credit default swap) quotes and charts (via CMA?) are no longer available on a delayed basis at Bloomberg.com. Not sure why they didn't put volume on there. It was important to monitor bank and sovereign CDS recently because banks (again) and countries were at risk of defaulting on their debt or having liquidity runs. And there is counterparty risk all over again with the banks, just like in 2008. As you know, banks voluntarily agreed to take a 50% haircut on their Greek debt, so there will be no credit event triggering payments on Greek CDS. Unless something changes: Greece calls referendum on EU bail-out (FT 10/31/2011), Greek referendum could mean CDS Greek default trigger (CreditWritedowns), Papandreou Calls on Greeks to Back EU Debt Accord in Referendum (BizWeek). WTF? Either way, this market is important to watch, as you can see. But more importantly, corporate bond CDS and securitized debt CDS (mortgage-backed securities or MBS CDS- see the Markit links below), which price the risk of the overall credit market.

For some reason the powers that be continue to prevent price transparency in single-name OTC (over-the-counter) credit derivatives. In my opinion, over-the-counter credit default swap exposures distort market risks because the activity is hidden from the majority of market participants. It can also provide a way for large investors to trade on inside credit information (via direct relationships with creditors in deals, board seats, etc.) and push for a bankruptcy filing to get paid off at par, whether they own the bonds or not. This is also BS because private external intentions on public securities misleads the market and other investors. CDS activity can also tip off trading opportunities in other markets. But more importantly, when the credit market turns sour, credit derivatives fuel counterparty risk fears, which puts banks and large brokerages at risk and the whole economy, like we saw in 2008 and now again in Europe. Question... Can activist investors with seats on a company's board of directors build unreported synthetic short positions via credit default swaps while f--king with the company?

With OTC bond quotes and charts (what credit default swaps are supposed to insure) publicly available and fully transparent on FINRA.org (securities regulator), it makes me wonder why there's a lack of transparency in the $29.8 trillion CDS market. Derivatives were partly responsible for the financial crisis in 2008, and without government bailouts, it would have been a moment of judgment for these derivatives. What is the FINRA equivalent for credit default swaps, the ISDA? Update: You can view weekly activity of the top 1,000 reference entities' gross and net notional values at the DTCC (Depository Trust and Clearing Corporation), which is like the "open interest" for equity options. But again this is delayed data. Here is more on the data available at FINRA:

"Welcome to the Bond Section of the Market Data Center. This section includes general bond market information such as news, benchmark yields, and corporate bond market activity and performance information, descriptive data on U.S. Treasury, Agency, Corporate and Municipal Bonds, Credit Rating Information from major rating agencies, and price information with real-time transaction prices for Corporate and Agency Bonds (TRACE), Municipal Bonds (MSRB) and end of day prices for U.S. Treasury Bonds."

Markit, a credit derivative data provider, provides daily quotes and charts for CDX (corporate bond CDSs), ABX (asset-backed security CDSs), CMBX (commercial mortgage-backed security CDSs) and PrimeX (prime mortgage-backed security CDSs) Indices on their site, as well bond indices (iBoxx, iTraxx) and end of day closing prices for LCDX (leveraged loan CDSs), MCDX (muni CDSs) etc. FINRA now offers end-of-day trading activity reports and pricing tables for ABS, MBS and CMBS via TRACE (no historical charts though).

In short, this market allows hidden side bets on publicly traded debt, whether as a hedge or speculation (having exposure without actually trading the underlying security), which is really reserved for large financial institutions who can pay $100k-$1 million per year (depending on the rate) to insure $10 million worth of debt, and pay the brokerage fees and CDS data subscriptions. And 5-year credit default insurance is used by hedge funds to hedge equity longs (capital arbitrage). Not that this is a bad thing, but for the sake of human advancement in investing, how about a CDS data provider (CMA Datavision, Markit, DTCC) allows delayed single-name CDS quotes and charts on a website and monetize it with ads (it was delayed one-day before on Bloomberg.com). Or release a cheaper "lite" CDS product with delayed data. Or better yet, chop up the notional value of the contracts and put them on an exchange and make them available to the public via online brokerages like futures. And do the same thing with the cash bond market as well. Have exchange traded mini-bonds with exchange traded bond options available like the stock market. Why don't these markets fully exist yet in the discount retail brokerage system?

Macro-Man introduced the idea of "bond futures". There is a reason why this post has been my most popular post since July 2010. Hopefully they reappear on Bloomberg.com in some form in the future. Here's an interesting article at Macro-Man's blog on Greek CDS, credit default swaps and bond futures.


"But there is a viable alternative. TMM would like to introduce their readers to the humble Bond Future. That long-standing, well-understood derivative that has provided liquidity, transparency and price discovery to bond markets in many countries for 40 years. Bond futures with deliverable bond baskets allow basis trading, speculation and hedging, without the idiosyncrasies of CDS contracts. But of course, futures markets aren't that profitable for banks... well, you reap what you sow, right?"

Update: More links to quotes can be found in this comment.

Comments

  1. http://jakewilliamson.files.wordpress.com/2008/07/sisyphus1.jpg

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  2. I was searching Google for sov CDS and Bloomberg had had a bunch indexed.

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  3. http://www.google.com/search?q=site%3Abloomberg.com+5Y+CDS&btnG=Search&hl=en&sa=2

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  4. Thank you very much. Much appreciated....

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  5. Man it seems that u saved my life =))))lol THANK U A LOT

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  6. hi, Thx u a lot.
    I would like to see also the CDS volatility. Do u know where i can find it?
    thx again

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  7. CDS volatility... I'm afraid I don't, but I'd like to know.

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  8. This is awesome, but it looks like your link for Japanese CDS's are out of date. I'd love for a new one to be posted. I'll do some looking myself and see if I can find it. I want to keep an eye on this. I hear Japanese CDSs are ticking higher. If they go, the entire financial system goes with it, IMO.

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  9. The link works for JGB CDS, it was messed up for JGB yields. Here try again for the list.

    JGB Yields: http://www.distressedvolatility.com/2010/08/japanese-government-bond-yields-3-month.html

    JGB CDS: http://www.distressedvolatility.com/2010/10/useful-indicators-jgb-cds-bank-cds.html

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  10. Oh... and what would you call them? CDS rates? yields? premiums?

    - D

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  11. First of I don't trade CDS, I want to put that out there. 100 basis points is 1%. So 1% of $10 million bonds being insured is $100,000 per year. It is quoted as "spread". It is confusing, go to markit.com for more information. http://www.markit.com/en/

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  12. FYI: I was alerted to try this search string on Google for CDS quotes: cds "index performance" site:bloomberg.com. It works out pretty well.

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  13. Good morning everybody

    I propose you this useful link :

    http://aklilecoq.over-blog.com/pages/Taux_des_dettes_souveraines_et_CDS-4418181.html

    I'm french and my english spoken is very bad so I can't speak with you a lot.

    You can translate the website via google (so not perfect)

    Thanks for informations here

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  14. very very good! do you think is possible to find Argentina's CDS for 2001, before her default? thks a lot.

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  15. Hi, thanks for the post. I am trying to find more sov CDS info on Bloomberg but not succeeding. For example, searching for Poland in the search box yields Polish companies rather than the country. Sorry if this is rather elementary - if you have any tips, very much appreciated!

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  16. Hi, I look up 5Y CDS on Google. It looks like Bloomberg is starting to title the quotes now. So I searched for Poland 5Y CDS and found this http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=CPOLD1E5:IND 

    Republic of Poland(CPOLD1E5:IND)Hope this helps

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  17. Yes, I found 5Y and 10Y JGB CDS here http://www.distressedvolatility.com/2010/10/useful-indicators-jgb-cds-bank-cds.html and here are Japanese Government Bond yields http://www.distressedvolatility.com/2010/08/japanese-government-bond-yields-3-month.html.

    Also I found-

    Portugal 10Y CDS USD http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=CPGB1U10:IND

    Spain 10Y CDS EUR http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=CSPA1E10:IND

    UK 10Y CDS USD http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=CUKT1U10:IND

    Argentina 10Y CDS USD http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=CT350196:IND

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  18. Does anyone know a source on state bond yields (particualrly 10 year) of small countries, mainly the indebted ones of Eurozone like Irealnd, Greece, Portugal. Is it also possible to download the dayly prices of 5 years CDS?

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  19. Is it possible to download daily data on CDS 5Y?
    Is there also available data on bond yields and bond spreads?

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  20. You probably have to pay for Bloomberg or Reuters data to download. I found Government bond yields. Search my blog for Portugal, Greece or Ireland and posts should link you to the quote at Bloomberg.com.

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  21. Actually I was just told you can download data on bond yields at Central Bank websites.

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  22. thank you very much!! Immensely useful! Do you know how to get the 10yr ones? cheers

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  23. More http://www.distressedvolatility.com/2010/07/more-cds-quotes-on-bloomberg-credit.html

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  24. I don't have historical data, but hopefully soon.

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  25. YES, I found a great post at tickerforum.org with everything and more http://tickerforum.org/akcs-www?post=135432
    p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Helvetica}

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  26. I can't remove that previous comment. The actual link didn't work for a google search. Do this "5Y CDS site:bloomberg.com"

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  27. anyone know where I can find quotes of Canadian Bank CDS?

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  28. can you provide the link of CDS of major European banks?

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  29. I haven't found them yet, but will when I do.

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  30. hi, what about Iceland? Would be nice to see.

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  31. Hi,
     thanks for the useful data. could you tell me why i cannot find Australian 5y cds bonds? i cannot find the ticker anywhere..

    thanks and regards
     marco

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  32. HI, there's a post below which suggest the google search to do. for iceland i found this

    http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=CX855635:IND

    rgs marco

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  33. Hi
     i have a question. suppose i cannot find CDS spread for a nation... will that be fine to use instead the 5/10y government yield? i am assuming if cds spreads widen, the yield on government bond will increase as well. is that a safe assumption?
    rgsd
     marco

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  34. Yeah, I look at Gov bond yields as well.

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  35. Hi Dvolatility,
     question for you. Suppose i want to monitor CDS / Bonds Yields to see how the world economy is proceeding in general.
    will it be fair to monitor CDS/Bond gov yields of
    - UK, Germany, Netherlands, Sweden, Finland to monitor Eurozone
    - USA to monitor america
    - China, Japan,South Korea, Australia to monitor Asia
    - Brazil, Argentina to monitor south america
    ?

    Generally, for emerging markets, what should i look at? BRIC countries?

    thanks in advance for your help
    rgds
     marco

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  36. Hello,
     i thought i would contribute to this post if i can. i m interested in CDS as well, and gutted that most of the information available belongs to institutions (markit, cma)which ask you to pay to get that info.
    DVolatility, pls validate the link below, i think i managed to get Lloyds and RBS links

    LLOYDS TSB:http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=CLOY1E5:IND
    RBS:http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=CRBS1E5:IND
    BNP:http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=CBNP1E5:IND
    SOCGEN:http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=CSOC1E5:IND
    UNICREDIT:http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=CUNI1E5:IND

    Havent found Intesa, but found SanPaolo IMI instead, which (i guess) might be the
    parent company?
    http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=CSAN1E5:IND

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  37. Hi, it all depends on what type of risk you are looking at and how and why the instruments trades. Greek bond yields and CDSs are at records because there is actually a risk of default. Also, its economy is not doing that well. They can't print money. You can monitor the PIIGS CDS quote http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=.GIPSI:IND for all the eurozone periphery nations Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Greece and Span

    US bond yields and CDSs are moving differenty. Since they can print money, there's no actual risk of default. US Treasuries were rallying because QE2 was over, the debt ceiling debate (fiscal policy), credit downgrade, eurozone crisis and most likely pricing in economic risk. So there is a lot involved... Now inflation risk from printing money can force yields higher, which many believe will happen to the U.S and Japan eventually. This could increase default risk in the CDSs. U.S. Treasury yields are following the path of Japan for now.

    I think China CDS moves inversely with FXI, since it owns a bunch of state-owned banks. The Gov is at risk if there are bad loans. They can always print money as well.

    People also do basis trades and arbitrage in Gov bonds/CDS, so it is really up to who is moving the market imo...

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  38. Thanks! I found some more, see above.

    Credit Agricole http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=CCAI1E5:IND
    Banco Santander http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=CBSH1E5:IND

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  39. hi
     somehow i didn't manage to find CDS for Barclays / HSBC.... anyone could assist?
    regards
     marco

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  40. I found Barclays here http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=CBAR1E5:IND. I can't find HSBC.

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  41. I don't understand the CDS pricing from Bloomberg. am I correct that a price of 100 means that one pays 100USD per year for covering against the risk of default of a 5 year's note with a face value of 10,000$. If so then how is it possible that the CDS price can be more that 2000 5like Greece). This would mean that one pays more for insurance than the value of the insured product?

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  42. Ha, good question. I'm thinking it must mean someone really wants insurance on Greek debt. It is more interesting when CDSs are cheaper than the referenced bonds. Basis trades? You can see how the credit default swap market distorts risks in every other market if you can't see what's going on. These are mainly institutional investors/banks making side bets (over-the-counter) on underlying assets to speculate on, or hedge against, credit losses. I understand market makers and derivative traders need to hedge their books, but that is the reason why all the banks and insurance companies blew up in 2008. If the CDS market was open to the public using a discount broker like the equity options market, perhaps normal people could have had the chance to short the subprime mortgage market alongside Paulson & Co. and Goldman Sachs.

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  43. This is my thinking:

    CDS is really a speculative derivative vehicle (much more speculative than its underlying asset)

    1)If CDS >= 2000 (such as 3500 - 35% premium per year) it means:

    It's better to pay 35% and really want the underlying asset to go default (haircut as high as possible)


    --->You will earn MORE by the thing defaults than not defaulting


    And possibly sell the CDS after recovery.

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  44. Thanks for the answers... I understand it better now.
    If the CDS buyer thinks that the underlying asset will default within one year than it makes a lot of sence to pay more than 2000 (20%) for protection.

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  45. Clarify some words for you:

    It's more like "I WANT this thing to default" than "I THINK"

    Because CDS buyers (most are big money/banks/...) they can bid up with huge money.


    That's why, CDS is really an evil thing ppl say (especially during mortgage meltdown 2007)




    It's like if I pay 40% (that's Greece now)  to insurance company per year for YOUR "accident insurance"

    1)I REALLY WANT you do get run over by a car! like right now!

    so I can get 100% (the principal)

    If you DON'T die, I'll be disappointed.




    ***That's why ppl keeps saying unregulated derivative weapons are financial destruction.



    For the sake of Greek well-being..it makes sense to help them..not anymore when you can EARN MUCH MORE by NOT HELPING


    Silly instrument human beings invented

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  46. CDS is exactly same as put/call options in a stock. No difference. Problem lies with speculative behavior ("I want" this company go bust/to the moon)

    If you own put option (only put option, no stock) & for the sake of example you also own missiles.


    Don't you "want" to fire one of the missiles and land it in the corporate headquarters?

    Don't you want to destroy the company as fast as possible, so your put option can go into deep money as stock price -> $0




    ***There is an easy to regulate CDS & options market as well (they should HAVE been doing it):

    Ppl can only purchase/sell derivative if they ALSO OWN the underlying asset.


    So it really acts as "insurance", You own Greece govt bond & buy its CDS (make sense to protect & you will do everything to help not to default)



    same with option market.

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  47. Hi
     anyone could assist in finding CDS for BHP Billiton (AUS),  Petrobras and Companhia Vale do Rio Doce  (BRA) ?
    failing to find them, shall i monitor Brazil / Oz CDS? though i don't think there's a correlation between a company CDS and its country CDS...
    rgds
     marco

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  48. Hi,
     could anyone suggest where i can download data for LIBOR? i found EURIBOR here http://tickerforum.org/akcs-www?post=135432
    was wondering which other market rates are worth monitoring..?

    rgds
     marco

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  49. Hi Dvolatility,
     could you explain the following comment you made above?
    't's actually a great way to hedge debt and capitalize on credit volatility, until the insurer can't pay up on the claim '

    i can see how can you hedge (as cds are sort of insurance)  but how could you capitalize on credit vol>? by buying/ selling CDS? could you provide a simple example for that>?
    rgds
     marco

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  50. Credit default swaps are just like equity options but for credit. Both are insurance contracts, but they trade differently. So when there's fear in the credit market or on a specific credit, investors or traders either buy insurance to hedge, or speculate on the need for hedging. Fear creates volatility. Just like how hedge funds made billions speculating on subprime mortgage backed securities in CDOs, it could be happening now with sovereign debt insurance in Europe. The problem is the CDS market isn't available through retail brokers in smaller increments. At least not that I know of.

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  51. thanks dvol.
    i assume *speculate on the need for hedging* means take larger position in a CDS?
    rgs
     marco

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  52. Buying insurance without owning the underlying bond. Like buying naked puts on a stock.

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  53. Hi,
    apparently found this on bloomberg for LIBOR. Is it the corec

    http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=EE0003M:IND

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  54. could u find ABX index chart?

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  55. do appreciate this effort.

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  56. Hi, there are free charts of the ABX, CMBX and CDX indexes going back 6 months at Markit.com http://www.markit.com/en/products/data/indices/structured-finance-indices/abx/abx-prices.page?

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  57. how did you find this information? thanks, very nice work and very useful in this market.

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  58. Anyone know the Morgan STanley ticker for their cds 

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  59. yeah Morgan Stanley CDS is http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=CMWD1U5:IND

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  60. yeah Morgan Stanley CDS is http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=CMWD1U5:IND

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  61. any idea on CDS for Raiffeisen Bank or Assicurazioni Generali? thanks! 

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  62. could u find VietNam CDS chart?

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  63. Poland CDS doesn't work.. any website that you can recomend where can we get CDS daily update fro poland?
    thanks..

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  64. It works. It doesn't show intraday data, it is delayed 1-day.

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  65. Hello. My 2 cents here.
    in all this post there's a google query you can run, it gives you lot of data with regards to Sovereign CDS posted by dvolatility long time ago. for companies, it's somehow a combination of their stock ticker plus the currency for their CDS. you will notice that most of European bank CDS are quoted in EUR.
    It takes some patience :) to find out the proper CDS ticker :)  good luck!

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  66. hi dvolatility, are you a MarkIt data subscriber? last time i check it was not free........ or can you get some data for free?
    thanks and regards 
      marco

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  67. Well this sucks.

    I finally find a web page that has allows me to monitor CDS activity and POOF, it's gone.

    The way you set it up was terrific, it made more sense to bookmark this page and use it as a jumpoff point than trying to remember tickers, etc.  I had become a frequent visitor.  Sorry I didn't thank you BEFORE your efforts to provide greater transparency were snuffed out. 

    But thank you.

    It was nice while it lasted.

    Mark

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  68. Huge buzz kill. I thought they planning to roll all delayed CDS data on their website, volume and price activity. If they don't do it, I don't understand why CMA Datavision doesn't just do it and monetize it w/ ads. Or release a cheaper "lite" product. This is a huge step back for transparency and I seriously don't think it lasts behind the scenes like this.

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  69. WOOHOO!!!
     
     Stopped by to collect tickers and see if I could find quotes elsewhere (ok, so I've gotten a little bit addicted).  They're back, Dvol!

    Which means you've now joined the crazy club I did when I wrote about the wayback machine (archive.org) excluding all pages from yahoo.

    http://acrossthestreetnet.wordpress.com/2011/10/06/another-sad-day-for-truth-justice-and-the-american-way/

    The Wayback was scheduled for maintenance, but the yahoo pages were excluded BEFORE the maintenance window.  When the pages came back, I looked like a total tool (with only a single captured screenshot seperating me from the room with the padded walls).

    I'm glad to see the data back, and am looking forward to your "updated update."

    Wierd note: Greek CDS shows zero at the top of the page, but the custom charts at the bottom are still showing quotes (shhhhhh....)

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  70. I knew it. I was holding off on a new post on this, so I'm glad they came back.

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  71. HI, found both LIBOR AND EURIBOR @BLOOMBERG

    LIBOR: http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=EE0003M:IND
    EURIBOR: http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=EUR003M:IND

    hth
     marco

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  72. Hello, could anyone help me out in finding the CDS for Apple?

    rgds
     marco

    ReplyDelete
  73. This list of cds links help me a lot
    thanks you

    yesfx from taiwan

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  74. this list of cds links help me a lot

    yesfx from taiwan

    ReplyDelete
  75. HSBC is 
    http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CT786869:IND

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  76. i've revealed almost of cds quote links on bloomberg. it was around 700 of cds total.
    i  think this is good place to dump it :) here's some american corporate cds linksAllstate Corp http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CALL1U5:INDTarget Corp http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CTGT1U5:INDHartford Financial Services Group http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CHIG1U5:INDMacy's Inc. http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CFD1U5:INDEl Paso Corp http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CEP1U5:INDGoodyear Tier & Rubber Co http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CGT1U5:INDEastman Kodak Co http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CEK1U5:INDGeorgia-Pacific LLC http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CGP1U5:INDCigna Corp http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CCI1U5:INDGoodrich Corp http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CGR1U5:INDKroger Co http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CKR1U5:INDFreeport-McMoRan Corp http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CPD1U5:INDHome Depot Inc http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CHD1U5:INDBrunswick Inc http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CBC1U5:INDDeere & Co http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CDE1U5:INDGeneral Dynamics Corp http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CGD1U5:INDChubb Corp http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CCB1U5:INDDiamond Offshore Drilling Inc http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CDO1U5:INDConsolidated Edison Co of New York Inc http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CED1U5:INDPraxair Inc http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CPX1U5:INDWeyerhaeuser Co http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CWY1U5:INDFirstEnergy Corp http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CFE1U5:INDAvis Budget Group Inc http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CCD1U5:INDColgate-Palmolive Co http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CCL1U5:IND
    United States Steel Corp http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CUS1U5:IND
    Gap Inc http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CGPS1U5:IND
    Prudential Financial Inc http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CPRU1U5:IND
    Wachovia Corp http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CWB1U5:IND
    El du Pont de Nemours & Co http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CDD1U5:IND
    Procter & Gamble Co http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CPG1U5:IND
    Walt Disney Co http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CDIS1U5:IND
    AT&T Mobility LLC http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/CCNG1U5:IND

    well. it's too much to post all here. i'll post rest of them later.
    Cheers from South Korean Trader.

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  77. Kospi-rocks Could you help me find Bank Of New York Mellon.  I have been trying to figure it out using your links and I have had no luck.  Thank you sir. 

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  78. Hello all,

    I was wondering if any of you knew where to get CDS data from countries of the GCC? (Oman, Bahrain, Qatar, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and the UAE). Thank you for your help.

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  79. Aye man brother, much agreed. I think this market is an absolute Pandora's Box, and it is simply to large and too late to put her back in! It is sheer insanity that you can buy all the CDS you want without owning a cent of the underlying. I think this market is very likely to be one of the primary sources of the next crisis or blow-up. Great work. Thanks again. 

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  80. Article at FT: 
    Another troublesome feature of CDS usage 

    http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/5fa796ea-7cbd-11e1-8a27-00144feab49a.html#axzz1rZunTXhe

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  81. I would be happy to see a more comprehensive list that (where applicable) includes such subordinated debt

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  82. OK, while it is nice to see CDS prices, how can a little guy buy/sell them? Did not think that was possible. If not, are they more than just interesting?

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  83. Hello
      CDS data from bloomberg vanished again :(

    you can get CDS data for sovereign from CNN..    I'll post the link tomorrow

    some CDS are still retrievable via bloomberg, i'll try to post here the link of what's available as well

    keep up the good work!
      Marco

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  84. Hi Marco,

    Hi, I see that some are down. Including Hewlett-Packard which I wanted to blog about. I'm reverting back to the distressedvolatility.com disqus template because it looks like all of the comments got deleted when I switched it to blogspot. So these comments might get deleted. We'll see.

    ReplyDelete
  85. This board will be closed until all of the comments on Disqus are back up again. Something happened during the domain name migration.

    ReplyDelete
  86. fantastic page. thank you

    ReplyDelete
  87. If you are French speaker, you can find daily CDS prices free on this website: www.boursorama.com

    You can see 5Y Sovereign CDS prices here:
    http://www.boursorama.com/bourse/taux/liste_cds.phtml?type_cds=souverains&secteur_cds_id=0&geo_cds_pays_id=0&geo_cds_region_id=0&valid_cds=

    You can see 5Y Company CDS prices here:
    http://www.boursorama.com/bourse/taux/liste_cds.phtml?type_cds=entreprises&secteur_cds_id=0&geo_cds_pays_id=0&geo_cds_region_id=4&valid_cds=

    They are sourced from Markit of course.

    Enjoy!

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  88. Thank you for your post. I am looking for this information and it is pretty difficult. Indeed, there is no more information about it in Bloomberg.

    Here are my findings. DTCC is compelling and publishing all data related to CDS. It, actually, handles 99% of all CDS over the world. You can find it in the link below. There are 4 sections and there is data about the magnitude of the CDS market. However, as far as I can see, it does not provide the spreads.

    http://www.dtcc.com/products/derivserv/data/index.php

    For DTCC, I have go to Table 6 of Section 1. There, you will see the size of CDS value outstanding and the number of contract per "reference entities" (that is the generic name to speak about a Country or a Corporate).

    Before DTCC, the only company that provided information about CDS was ISDA. In the link below, it provides some spreads, but not for all :

    http://www2.isda.org/

    For the spreads I have found the following ressources, free of charge:

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/38451750

    http://www.dbresearch.com/servlet/reweb2.ReWEB?rwnode=DBR_INTERNET_EN-PROD$EM&rwobj=CDS.calias&rwsite=DBR_INTERNET_EN-PROD

    Then there are company that provides information to professional based on the data they retrieved mainly from DTCC. I have two of them. CMA provides interesting information about CDS in the learning section that is free.

    http://www.cmavision.com/learning/
    http://eu.spindices.com/index-family/credit-default-swap/credit-default-swap

    But so far I could not find a place where I can have the CDS for all country. There is approximatively 57 countries having CDS. Excellent paper on CDS

    http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2188270

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  89. Fitch Solutions has CDX charts available: http://www.fitchpricingservices.com/indices.do

    NORTH AMERICAN INDICES

    CDX NA HY 5y High Yield Overall Series 20 (ex 06/2018)
    CDX NA IG 5y Investment Grade Series 20 (ex 06/2018)
    CDX 5y Emerging Markets Series 19 (ex 06/2018)
    CDX NA HY 5y High Yield Overall Series 19 (ex 12/2017)
    CDX 5y Emerging Markets Series 18 (ex 12/2017)

    EUROPEAN INDICES
    iTRAXX Europe - 125 Series 19 (ex 06/2018)
    iTRAXX Europe - Crossover Price Index Series 19 (ex 06/2018)
    iTRAXX Europe - Senior-Financials Price Index Series 19 (ex 06/2018)
    iTRAXX Europe - Sub-Financials Price Index Series 19 (ex 06/2018)
    iTRAXX Europe - HiVol Price Index Series 19 (ex 06/2018)

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  90. If you are French speaker, you can find daily CDS prices free on this website: www.boursorama.com You can see 5Y Sovereign CDS prices here: http://www.boursorama.com/bourse/taux/liste_cds.phtml?type_cds=souverains&secteur_cds_id=0&geo_cds_pays_id=0&geo_cds_region_id=0&valid_cds= You can see 5Y Company CDS prices here: http://www.boursorama.com/bourse/taux/liste_cds.phtml?type_cds=entreprises&secteur_cds_id=0&geo_cds_pays_id=0&geo_cds_region_id=4&valid_cds= They are sourced from Markit of course. Enjoy!

    ReplyDelete

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