David Rosenberg on Whether the U.S. Faces a Japanese-Style Lost Decade (Munk Debate Video)

Watch last night's Munk Debate on whether the U.S. faces a Japanese-style lost decade of high unemployment, slow growth and deflation. David Rosenberg, Chief Economist and Strategist at Gluskin Sheff, and Paul Krugman, Economist and Economics Professor at Princeton, believe this is the case. They debated with Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group, and Lawrence Summers, former U.S. Treasury Secretary.

David Rosenberg during the first segment (not from official transcript)
David Rosenberg at Munk Debate
"Despite the fact that we have had 3 years of unprecedented and radical stimulus in the economy. I mean, as you've already heard we've had policy rates in the U.S. at zero. Zero percent policy rates for three years... We have had the Fed take it's balance sheet into the stratosphere. Which was once an $800 billion stable balance sheet is now $2.5 trillion. And we've had at the same time three years of government deficits in the U.S at the Federal level of over 10% of GDP. I mean, FDR never ran the deficit above 6% of GDP. For one year in the New Deal we've had three years of unprecedented fiscal stimulus. And yet what did we get out of it?... Real GDP growth of barely more than 2% at an average annual rate. Historically, what is normal in the context of a post World War II post recession recovery nine quarters in where we are today, and the answer is 5.5%."
"Our policy makers are bumping against the severe headwinds otherwise known as the debt deleveraging cycle. And also the fact that we still have a depression in housing four years after the initial detonation. But we have a consumer debt deleveraging in the United States of unprecedented proportions. We had what was a forty year secular credit expansion that went absolutely parabolic in 2002 because we had a government that believed that as an antidote to a bursted dot-come bubble we can actually save the system by engineering a financial and housing bubble. And so, that is the basic problem that we have on our hands, is, the largest component of the global economy called the U.S. household sector, 70% of GDP, is trying desperately to get out of debt..."
"So, so far the household sector has paid down or walked away from, delevered, roughly $1 trillion. And if we're talking about the concept of mean reversion, and mean reversion is very important in this business, and we're talking about taking debt/asset and debt/income ratios back to pre-bubble norms, which I believe is going to happen, you're talking about another $3 trillion of deleveraging."
How long do deleveraging cycles last?: "Working through these asset and credit cycles take seven years. So we've finished two, and I'm going to be optimistic, only 5 more to go" (he said that data was from McKinsey research)

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